What you Need to Know at 7 Weeks Pregnant

Overview

When you are 7 weeks pregnant, your little one is growing and more of his body parts are emerging. If you could take a peek inside your uterus, you will see that your baby is beginning to transform into a small person. Right now at 7 weeks pregnant, your baby is half an inch long, about similar to a size of a blueberry fruit or growing up to 13mm in length.

Now that you are on your week 7 of your pregnancy, many things are occurring to you together with your little one. 

You are also midway through your first trimester and more changes will come to both of you.

You Baby’s Development this Week

At 7 weeks pregnant, your baby’s facial features are starting to take shape including the mouth with a tongue and his eyes with retina and lens are now attached as it grows faster. Since the embryo’s circulatory system is now operational, this week, your baby is now forming his own blood type. While in his fast growing phase, his muscles, bones and organs continue to develop. 

Your baby’s intestines and appendix are now completely developed while his liver is also starting to the production of his red blood cell.

When you go for an ultrasound, you will be able to see that your baby now has toes, arms, leg buds and fingers. Inside his mouth, his teeth and tongue is also developing however, they cannot be seen just yet. Here’s one remarkable thing. Your baby has a tiny tail! But don’t worry if you think he’s becoming a cat or dog. This tail will soon disappear over the coming weeks.

Since your baby has already developed three sets of kidneys, this week, they’ll begin developing their final set which will be ready for waste management. Your baby will also start to pee or produce urine that will turn a part of the amniotic fluid. He is also beginning to move however, you will not feel anything just yet. Your little one is also getting a much more complex brain compared to last week.

Your Body Changes while 7 Weeks Pregnant

Overall changes

7 weeks pregnant

If you keep your pregnancy as a secret, you may not be able to keep it for long. Your body will tell it for you! There’s still no major physical change that is happening; only minors such as your waistline changing. Most of these changes are presently inside your body. The mucus on your cervix becoming thick, forming a plug that will keep your uterus sealed until your delivery. This is one of the major developments inside your body. The plug will eventually lose when pregnancy labor and childbirth are close.

The body changes vary from every pregnant woman and at slightly different pace. Common early pregnancy symptoms is still coming after you, including unending pregnancy nausea which will come to you anytime of the day, drooling or excessive saliva, exhaustion, achy body, crankiness and feeling queasy and again, one of the worse symptoms, morning sickness. However, don’t panic or feel scared about these things that you are experiencing. This also means that the pregnancy hormones are preparing your body for your upcoming baby delivery.

You will still experience frequent urination because of the increasing blood volume and presence of extra fluid in your kidneys. This week, you already have about 10 percent more blood than you did prior pregnancy. As your uterus expands, pressure on your bladder, it will urge you to have frequent trips to your bathroom. According to a research, the frequency and volume of urine, equally, get inclined to increase more than the course of pregnancy.

More early pregnancy symptoms will come such as pain, headaches, tender breasts and craving for food that you don’t usually like to eat (even the food you thought was disgusting for you before). Well, this is normal for pregnant woman as long as it does not harm your baby’s health.

Breast specific

Your breasts will get sore and swollen turning like fruit melons and you will notice that you have different size of bra. Some pregnant says they become full cup size when they were 7 weeks pregnant. The reason why your breasts get swollen is because of the pregnancy hormones estrogen and progesterone, causing many changes inside your body.

Aside from this, fats are also getting on your breasts area, added to that; this is also because of the increasing blood flow. You will also notice that your breasts become more sensitive and might get tender.

Touching it will make you uncomfortable. The areola, which is the dark area on your nipple, may even get darker and bigger. In the coming months, they will become bigger and darker in color. Montgomery tubercles, bumps-like goosebumps spots are also developing around the areola. Basically, these are sweat glands that lubricate the areola. Why is this happening to your breasts? This is because your breasts are gearing for its important function, breastfeeding.

What to Think and to Do this Week

Though your baby is still about the size of a blueberry, you will still notice that there’s a slightly change on your waistline and that you may be feeling uncomfortable of wearing your jeans. Now is the time for you to buy maternity clothes. You may not really need them just yet, however, in the coming weeks, you will notice that your body, especially your belly, will expand and grow that you won’t be able to fit on your usual size of clothes. Now is also the time to talk to your company's human resources department to get straight answers regarding your maternity leave whether you will still receive payment, support or get unpaid for this before your first trimester ends.

While going through your pregnancy, and if it is your first time, pregnancy symptoms will surely bring you to a roller coaster ride, leading you to mood swings, nausea, achy body and more. Get some advice from your friends or your health care provider on how to handle these things at 7 weeks pregnant. And as always, choose healthy foods for your baby’s health

Stephanie
 

Editor in Babiology, mother of two, highly passionate about sharing the pregnancy care and post delivery care learning with the readers.

Click Here to Leave a Comment Below 0 comments